Wednesday, 21 November 2012

Accept difference. Not indifference!

So tonight I returned to a group jointly run by my local Surrey Advocacy Group together with the National Autistic Society   (NAS). I have been a member of the National Autistic society for many years and found them incredibly supportive and I had stopped attending the meetings for personal reasons which I won;t go into. Inspired by the fact that the local NAS amabassador invited me back to try it as it is under new leadership I went along to see what it was like . So I thought I would blog a little in case any of you know anyone who may benefit from this mummy rambling :-)
Autism Alert card
This is the card I carry in my handbag , I even got one for a friend :-)
91p in every £1 goes directly to helping people affected by autism.
It takes £20 a month  give practical support to someone with autism who is looking for work. You will find lots of advice and details on their website if you want to know more about how they help people like me and my children on the spectrum.
Or how about buying some Xmas cards - check out next years competition for Adults and children alike and maybe enter your design here 
These meetings have proved invaluable for me as an undiagnosed adult with Aspergers. I discovered a likeness to my diagnosed children almost two decades ago . The NAS has been helping people like me for 50 years and yet as we discovered tonight there are still many of us who remain without a diagnosis. Sadly there is not enough funding for PR on local groups and the amazing contribution they make to our daily lives and to that end I leave you with some links to browse should you find the time . I have met some wonderful people through the NAS events .  I hope you can accept the difference too and not be Indifferent . Find out if there is a local support group near you , I host the ocassional coffee morning for newly diagnosed parents of children on the spectrum and I also atted meetings such as the one tonight to receive support as an adult . Let's spread the work we are not disabled , as Wendy Lawson one said we just want you to accept our differability - we are different and may of us have abilities if you take the time to get to know us . A label is only as good as what it can tell you about someone . If carrying a card , helps then do it .
'I know that I am alive; I breathe, move, talk and function just like any other Human Being. However, I understand (because it has been said to me) that other people perceive me as being different to them. My difference expresses itself in various ways, (egocentricity, eccentricity, and emotional immaturity) but, in particular, in my uneven skill ability. Life seems to me to be like a video that I can watch, but not partake in. I sense that I live my life 'Behind Glass'. However, at times I am completely taken up with an obsession or a perception that may dominate my existence and make it easy to stay focused. For me, such times mean that I feel 'connected' to life. Life, for me, takes on meaning and purpose.' Quote from Wendy Lawson a  dear friend of mine , who made me realise it was time to step beyond my gold fish bowl 
her poems speak straight to my heart - here is a copy of one that I simply had to share:
"Autism is: being present in this world,
But not entirely of it.
I am one step removed and curled,
The switch just doesn't click. I perform the role of my perception,
And play many parts so well.
But minus files for my redemption,
My part in life I cannot tell. Life is like a video,
I watch but cannot partake.
My uneven skills are but an echo,
Of the frustrations which I hate! However, my focused use of time and space,
I would not give away.
I know that I am especially placed,
For some developed career one day! " 


with thanks to Wendy Lawson for reminding me that I am indeed able x


Wendys Book  which first lead me to seek her out and meet her can still be found here ..http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1853029114/nationalautistic



2 comments:

  1. Funnily enough, I worked briefly wiht a lady who had aspergers, but I only found afterwards, For me she was challenging, not because of aspergers, but because I found he took me to levels of detail I didn't know existed! our biggest problem was one of communication - I can be too big picture, and very tactile, and this caused her some issues. But we worked with them. To me, she was great at her job, and what I mistook for a lack of confidence, was actually her processing. And I am glad I didn't know whilst we were working together, as that may have changed my perception and behviours. Instead, she was just a different personality typ for me to learn to work with - and learn I did!

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